Interviews

The biggest issue

Professor Jane D’Arista’s broad and deep expertise spans monetary policy and regulation.  Rick Rowden asked her some large-scale questions about the global economy for The Mint. The Mint:      What are your

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All change

Former Czech Prime Minister Vladimír Špidla says our way of life is pulling into its final stop. He tells The Mint it’s time for the world to get off and

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Commons concern

American natural resource economist, Erik Nordman, has just written a book about Elinor Ostrom, the first woman to win the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. The Mint quizzed him

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Cop out?

So what can we expect from COP26, billed as the “most important international meeting to address climate change yet”? Will country ambition “ratchet up” as the architects of the Paris

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The climate crisis cause

As we struggle to find common international cause to address climate change, you might not immediately think of reaching for a philosopher’s book – How to think about the climate

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Big guy for the little guy

Tim Cowen is a campaigning barrister representing small businesses against the dominant players in digital. The Mint heard from him about the new international coordination of anti-trust action against the

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Tribes and tribulations

Feted author, journalist and anthropologist, Gillian Tett has a new book: Anthro Vision: How Anthropology Can Explain Business and Life. She told The Mint what Anthro Vision was and how

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Lone interest

Loneliness is not a standard subject for economists. So The Mint was intrigued to talk to Noreena Hertz about her new book, The Lonely Century: A Call to Reconnect. Noreena

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The coarse in economics

Tom Bergin is an award-winning, financial journalist of long standing. He tends to specialise in the seamier side of corporate behaviour, his previous book being on the BP Horizon disaster.

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From Russia with luck

A tale of corruption and corridors. The Mint hears how Alena Ledeneva looks for favours. During the final days of the Soviet Union in 1990, a young sociology student in

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The growing realisation

Tim Jackson has just published a new book, Post Growth – Life After Capitalism, examining our disastrous obsession with growth in a finite world and how we might escape it. 

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After the bull’s left the shop

Six months ago we talked to German economist and erstwhile policy adviser, Wolfram Elsner, about the future of China and geo-political economics. He had just published a book, The Chinese

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Intensive Care

Over five years, Madeleine Bunting travelled the country, speaking to charity workers, doctors, social workers, in-home carers, nurses, palliative care teams and parents, to explore the value of care. Out

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Pioneering spirit

Steve Keen, bête noir of neo-classical economists and author of Debunking Economics, has just published an article in which he sets out a new approach to macro-economic modelling he has

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Indian Summary

Surbhi Kesar is a young, Indian, pluralist economist, who has been researching the impact of Covid-19 on vulnerable Indians. The report she has contributed made the newspaper headlines in India.

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The Clout of Africa

The Mint caught up again with US-based, Kenyan economist, Mwangi wa Gĩthĩnji, on how Africa is coping with the pandemic and what that might mean in the long term with

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Youth is not enough

This issue Mwangi wa Gĩthĩnji was going to talk to The Mint about the economic success of the Ethiopian development model. However given current events, he was keen to talk

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Cooperatives on the table

Jessica Gordon-Nembhard is a leading economist studying co-operatives. In fact she effectively invented this economic research agenda in the US. She was brought up by social activists who discussed Marx

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Saving you the trouble

Felicia Wong and her team at the Roosevelt Institute in New York have just read the work of 150 leading new economics thinkers so you don’t have to. They have

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Theoretically speaking

Randy Wray was one of the finalists for our #NotTheNobel prize in October and is one of the world’s leading advocates of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT). It might sound like

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Over tea

In a new series of interviews, we talk to Mwangi wa Gĩthĩnji about economic innovations in Africa. In our first interview Mwangi talks about the Kenyan Tea Development Authority established

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A World Away

Economics training in Africa has long been funded by the World Bank so it keeps to the narrow track of mainstream economics – as do the economic policies in Africa.

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Significantly speaking

Stephen Ziliak has spent much of his illustrious career in economics examining the significance of significance – that is the statistical test of significance. It turns out how this test

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A New Leaf

Michael Jacobs was a special advisor to Gordon Brown when the idea of the Green New Deal (GND) first emerged in the UK in 2008 as a green response to

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Bots and bell ringing

Richard Baldwin is a leading international expert and author on globalisation. In his most recent book, he writes about the coming age of “globotics”, an even more intense globalisation plus

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Open Season?

The debate in the US on economics in the policy sphere has suddenly exploded with discussion of the Green New Deal and taxation on the wealthy. Much of this is

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A hole in the heart

Grazia Ietto-Gillies has spent her career as an economist seeking to fill a crucial gap: the exclusion of transnational corporations into economic thinking.  And this gap is not a small

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Taking a part

So who enjoys being on committees? The prospect of community collaboration is haunted by the spectre of meetings, minutes, legal status, insurance etc. This is off-putting for even those inured

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They think it’s all over

Our main political parties see a reputation for economic competence as key for achieving power. The Tory party is reportedly scared that a Brexit disaster will destroy its reputation, which

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A change is as good as a rest

John Kay has embraced uncertainty and explains how we must do this to make economics relevant. Meanwhile little has changed he tells The Mint. With the Lehman Brothers collapse and the

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Three Come Forth

A trio of leaders of organisations that have emerged as responses to the Crash talk to The Mint about the progress so far and the future outlook. Maeve Cohen, Fran

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Good work if you can get it

Interview – Matthew Taylor Chief Executive of the Royal Society of the Arts, Matthew Taylor, last year led a review for the Government to consider how employment practices needed to change

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Caring and Sharing

Interview: Juliet Schor Since 2010 Juliet Schor has been studying the recent phenomenon that is the sharing economy. She first rose to prominence in the 1990s with her bestselling book

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Stewarding Zebras

Armin Steuernagel has founded a new company called Purpose. It supports people who want help transforming their companies into models of steward ownership guided by public purpose. He tells how

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Will turkeys vote for Christmas?

The British Academy doesn’t seem the obvious place to start a revolution. Nevertheless, Professor Colin Mayer is leading a research project there to rethink the nature of corporations and hence,

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Street Fighter

Laura McCullagh works with people who are in danger of homelessness. She tells The Mint how her clients’ difficulties begin with lack of money and how she tries to guide

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Growing pains

Tim Jackson gained his global reputation outside academia with his groundbreaking book Prosperity without Growth, originally published in 2009 as a report from the Sustainable Development Commission for the UK government. In it he

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Annulus mirabilis

Raworth: I’m not a serious academic; I’m a serious activist. Kate Raworth has, in her blend of new economic thinking, served up a printed equivalent of hot cakes with her

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State: your business

Barker: “Politicians are perfectly entitled to do things to political ends but you’ve got to have somebody who encourages them to stop and think before they do.” The government has

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Unorthodox Greek

Yanis Varoufakis is a heavyweight academic economist with a rare combination of style and substance. He talks to The Mint. Economics professor, Yanis Varoufakis, describes himself as a “failed finance minister

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A return to fundamentals

Hall: “Most production models of economics are not based on these biophysical laws and principles; in fact, they tend to ignore them.” For decades mainstream economics has been able to

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