Interviews

Taking a part

So who enjoys being on committees? The prospect of community collaboration is haunted by the spectre of meetings, minutes, legal status, insurance etc. This is off-putting for even those inured

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They think it’s all over

Our main political parties see a reputation for economic competence as key for achieving power. The Tory party is reportedly scared that a Brexit disaster will destroy its reputation, which

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The hard way

The Mint talked to Professor Ozlem Onaran about her journey from an undergraduate degree in engineering to being a professor in economics at Greenwich University. She started her career in

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A change is as good as a rest

John Kay has embraced uncertainty and explains how we must do this to make economics relevant. Meanwhile little has changed he tells The Mint. With the Lehman Brothers collapse and the

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Three Come Forth

A trio of leaders of organisations that have emerged as responses to the Crash talk to The Mint about the progress so far and the future outlook. Maeve Cohen, Fran

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Good work if you can get it

Interview – Matthew Taylor Chief Executive of the Royal Society of the Arts, Matthew Taylor, last year led a review for the Government to consider how employment practices needed to change

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Caring and Sharing

Interview: Juliet Schor Since 2010 Juliet Schor has been studying the recent phenomenon that is the sharing economy. She first rose to prominence in the 1990s with her bestselling book

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Stewarding Zebras

Armin Steuernagel has founded a new company called Purpose. It supports people who want help transforming their companies into models of steward ownership guided by public purpose. He tells how

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Will turkeys vote for Christmas?

The British Academy doesn’t seem the obvious place to start a revolution. Nevertheless, Professor Colin Mayer is leading a research project there to rethink the nature of corporations and hence,

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Street Fighter

Laura McCullagh works with people who are in danger of homelessness. She tells The Mint how her clients’ difficulties begin with lack of money and how she tries to guide

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Growing pains

Tim Jackson gained his global reputation outside academia with his groundbreaking book Prosperity without Growth, originally published in 2009 as a report from the Sustainable Development Commission for the UK government. In it he

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Annulus mirabilis

Raworth: I’m not a serious academic; I’m a serious activist. Kate Raworth has, in her blend of new economic thinking, served up a printed equivalent of hot cakes with her

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State: your business

Barker: “Politicians are perfectly entitled to do things to political ends but you’ve got to have somebody who encourages them to stop and think before they do.” The government has

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Unorthodox Greek

Yanis Varoufakis is a heavyweight academic economist with a rare combination of style and substance. He talks to The Mint. Economics professor, Yanis Varoufakis, describes himself as a “failed finance minister

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A return to fundamentals

Hall: “Most production models of economics are not based on these biophysical laws and principles; in fact, they tend to ignore them.” For decades mainstream economics has been able to

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Model Agent

Mainstream economics’ failure to predict the 2008 crash undermined the profession’s public credibility. There’s a new game in town that financial risk guru, Rick Bookstaber, has faith in. He shares

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Weird and Wonderful

What does a cocaine baron have to offer society? Self-confessed chief misfit, Alexa Clay, has seen the best in some of the worst. Somali pirates throw great parties. This we

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A model agent

Mainstream economics’ failure to predict the 2008 crash undermined the profession’s public credibility. There’s a new game in town that financial risk guru, Rick Bookstaber, has faith in. He shares

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The Common Touch

Imagine a world where company success was determined by all the good it does. And where polluters of water, air and soil could not get investment. The Mint talks to

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Decisions, Decisions

Lamy: the possibilities of digital simulation struck “a visceral chord.” Artificial intelligence could guide decisions from the political to the personal, if people would seize the opportunities on offer. The Mint talks to Dahlia Lamy, who says the

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The only way is ethics

Pettifor: “Private authority can’t fully be trusted to uphold contracts.” Trust and compliance with regulation are not familiar virtues in the world of global finance according to Ann Pettifor. She

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He who pays the piper

Baker: his message struggles to be heard because a lot of money goes into calling the other tune. Dean Baker explains how calls for a new type of market –

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Pint sized pulls ahead

Sean Looney has travelled the world and has arrived at a career in craft beer. His is a complex brew. Business.  It’s not personal; never emotional it’s just business. While

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Three Years and Counting

Bête noir to established economists Steve Keen tells the Mint why Brexit ended a stupid policy but the government line on trade agreements is nonsense and an economic zombie apocalypse

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She who dares

A globally influential thinker, Gabriela Ramos, explains why a group of leading economies is challenging globalisation and other conventional wisdom. More than 30 of the world’s wealthiest countries with market

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